Haws Talks About Talented Quarterback Cousin

Freshman basketball sensation Tyler Haws is making a name for himself on the court. Being the son of former BYU standout guard Marty Haws, the athletic genes run deep in the family. With his quarterback cousin Alex Kuresa committing to BYU and his older cousin Jake having played offensive line for the Cougars, it appears the athletic talent isn't just limited to basketball.

Marty Haws' sister Susanne is Alex Kuresa's mother. So, the Haws and Kuresa families are very close and supportive of each other, including when it comes to sports.

"I was really excited when I found out that BYU had offered Alex a scholarship," said Tyler Haws. "It's a great thing and Alex is a great kid. We're very close as a family because we've grown up with our grandparents always getting the family together, so I'm used to seeing him all the time and we're very close and good friends.

"He's just a funny kid and has a great sense of humor," continued Haws. "He's a lot of fun to be around, and he works hard and is very confident in himself. He's willing to put in the work and have fun doing it. It's going to be a lot of fun having him here at BYU being a Cougar."

While at Lone Peak High School, Haws became the school's all-time leading scorer with 1,772 points. He was named the Deseret News Mr. Basketball as a junior and senior, becoming only the second player in the history of Utah to earning the honor in back-to-back years. It wasn't long before Stanford, Cal, Utah, Wake Forest and other college programs came calling for his services.

So, whenever the Haws and Kuresa families got together for family activities, Alex would get together with his highly recruited cousin and talk about the recruiting process he was going through.

"Whenever we would get together we would talk about where I was thinking about going to school and what I liked and thought about everything," said Haws. "I think for Alex it was a different process, because with football it's a different process with recruiting, but it's good that he got the chance to come here and decided to commit to BYU. It's going to be fun having him here."

Haws said he is also very close to Alex's older brother Jake, who was a 6-foot-4-inch, 330-pound First-Team All-MWC offensive lineman for BYU. Jake played at BYU from 2002 to 2006 and was a Sports Illustrated.com All-American Honorable Mention.

"Our family on that side is very close, and so we would come to all of Jake's games and supported him when he played on the offensive line here at BYU," said Haws. "He's a good guy too."

Naturally, with Jake having played at BYU, Alex followed the Cougars closely."

"[Alex] grew up a BYU fan because of his older brother playing here," said Haws. "He kind of always wanted to play here, so when he got a scholarship offer from BYU it's no surprise he committed as quickly as he did."

Haws recalled Alex first receiving his scholarship offer from BYU.

"When he first got the offer he called me and left a message," said Haws. "He was really excited about it and really pumped up and said he was coming. I was so excited for him and think he deserves it, and I was just as pumped up about it. He's worked really hard, and no one works harder than Alex does. He works his butt of and you can see the results of that hard work from his stats, so he's earned it for sure. It's going to be fun having some family here."

Alex has started as a quarterback for Mountain Crest High School since he was a freshman. As a sophomore he was a First-Team All-State and First-Team All-Region selection. He completed 188 of 276 attempts for 2,918 yards, 23 touchdowns and only nine interceptions. He also rushed for 289 yards (averaging 5.4 yards per carry) and five touchdowns.

As a junior, he completed 209 of 308 attempts for 3,481 yards, 39 touchdowns and just eight interceptions. Being a mobile quarterback, Alex also carried the ball 117 times for 397 yards and scored five touchdowns on the ground.

"He's kind of an underrated quarterback in the state," Haws said. "I think a lot of that has to do with his size, because he's only around 6'0" and, what, around 170 pounds? But you can't measure his heart, his competitiveness, work ethic and his ability to make plays on the field. What he does is pretty impressive."

This past season Alex had 375 passing yards against 4-A powerhouse and state championship Timpview, 427 yards against East High School, 437 yards against Ogden, and 342 yards against Highland.

"I've been out there a few times to watch Alex play," Haws said. "I was even out there for his second or third start when he was a freshman, and he was just this little dude out there on the field playing on the varsity team. He was out there making playing and winging passes around, so he was a great young quarterback and tough as nails. It's a lot of fun to see him out there on the field throwing the ball around and making plays all over the place."

On top of being a talented quarterback, Alex is also a pretty good basketball player in his own right.

"He's a pretty good point guard for Mountain Crest," said Haws with a smile. "I think he likes basketball but his first love is football, so I don't think there's much of a chance he'll be making the switch."

So what does Haws think of Alex's basketball abilities?

"He competes well and is a very good competitor," Haws said proudly. "He's quick enough where he can stay in front of guys and step out and hit threes. He's a really good athlete and I think he'll do a lot of good things as a football player for BYU."

Haws expounded on why he feels Alex will be a good football player for the Cougars.

"One of the more impressive things about Alex is he'll sit back there and read defenses and make a really quick decision," said Haws. "He also has the ability to make people or a defense pay for their mistakes, and that's one of the things he does really well. So I don't think he'll make the switch to basketball because he's really good at what he does. BYU is getting a really good athlete and it's going to be fun having a family member here. I'm excited."

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